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Knee Hyperextension

Winter Sports Injuries

Knee Hyperextension

Knee hyperextension occurs when the leg excessively straightens at the knee joint putting pressure on the joint. It can happen to anyone but is more common in athletes in high-speed and contact sports and during skiing.

Make An Enquiry

To ask a question, make an enquiry or book an appointment, contact our specialist orthopaedic team who are available between Monday – Friday 8am – 6pm. Our knee team have a dedicated and caring approach and will seek to find you the earliest appointment possible with the correct specialist for your needs.

 If you are self-paying you don’t need a referral from your GP. You can simply refer yourself and book an appointment.

If you have medical insurance (e.g. Bupa, Axa PPP, Aviva), you will need to contact your insurer to get authorisation for any treatment and, in most cases, you will require a referral letter from your GP.

If you do not have a GP, then we have an in-house private GP practice that you can use. Alternatively we can suggest the most appropriate course of action for you to take, given your location and individual circumstance.

Make an Enquiry

Knee Hyperextension

A knee hyperextension occurs when the leg excessively straightens at the knee joint putting pressure on the joint.

Knee Hyperextension Causes

It can happen to anyone but is more common in athletes in high-speed and contact sports and ski-ing. It is caused by a direct blow or the impact of forces released curing a sudden deceleration or stop. The knee joint is forced to bend the wrong way causing potential injury to knee ligaments.

Knee Hyperextension Symptoms

The pain can range from moderate to severe depending on the extent of the damage and the knee may feel unstable post injury. Bruising and swelling may result from tissue damage which can limit mobility.

Knee Hyperextension Treatment

Rest and recovery programmes allow the inflammation to subside and give the joint time to heal and moderate damage may only take two to four weeks to heal.

But an injured major ligament can need surgical reconstruction and a six-month rehabilitation plan. Some knee damage can be treated with arthroscopy but repair to the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) caused by hyperextension can involve surgery to remove the torn ligament and create a new one with a graft.

The procedure is effective and patients can return to full activity if they follow a gradual strengthening and mobility exercise strategy.

Contact Us Today

To ask a question about knee hyperextension or to book an appointment, contact our specialist team available Monday – Friday 8am – 6pm and on Saturday from 9am – 1pm. Our knee specialists team have a dedicated and caring approach and will seek to find you the earliest appointment possible with the correct specialist for your needs.

 If you are self-paying you don’t need a referral from your GP. You can simply refer yourself and book an appointment. 

If you have medical insurance (e.g. Bupa, Axa PPP, Aviva), you will need to contact your insurer for authorisation for any treatment and, in most cases, you will require a referral letter from your GP. If you do not have a GP, then we have an in-house private GP practice that you can use. Alternatively we can suggest the most appropriate course of action for you to take, given your location and individual circumstance.

Call us on 0207 266 6529 or email us at orthopaedicspecialists@hje.org.uk