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Trigger Finger

Trigger Finger

Trigger Finger

Trigger Fingers is a form tenosynovitis that is associated with sports such as golf and tennis and, increasingly, through intensive use of computer games consoles and smart phones.

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To ask a question, make an enquiry or book an appointment, contact our specialist orthopaedic team who are available between Monday – Friday 8am – 6pm. Our knee team have a dedicated and caring approach and will seek to find you the earliest appointment possible with the correct specialist for your needs.

 If you are self-paying you don’t need a referral from your GP. You can simply refer yourself and book an appointment.

If you have medical insurance (e.g. Bupa, Axa PPP, Aviva), you will need to contact your insurer to get authorisation for any treatment and, in most cases, you will require a referral letter from your GP.

If you do not have a GP, then we have an in-house private GP practice that you can use. Alternatively we can suggest the most appropriate course of action for you to take, given your location and individual circumstance.

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Trigger Finger:

Trigger Fingers is a form tenosynovitis that is associated with sports such as golf and tennis and, increasingly, through intensive use of computer games consoles and smart phones.

Causes

It is caused by an inflammatory condition that builds up with repetitive movements or long periods of gripping. The tendon becomes swollen and catches in its protective sheath, or tunnel, causing it to bunch up. It is more prevalent in women over the age of 40, people who have had previous finger injuries and rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes sufferers.

Symptoms

The finger bends towards the palm of the hand and will be stiff and painful in the morning and may be sensitive to the touch with a nodule developing at the base of the finger.

Diagnosis

Trigger Finger – and Trigger Thumb – can be diagnosed by observation and medical history.

Treatment

The first line of treatment is rest, anti-inflammatory medication and finger splints but a single corticosteroid injection can be considered in some cases.

Surgery, to allow the tendon to move freely again through the hand, can be performed under day surgery with a return to normal function expected in around two weeks. The operation is 100% effective.